Volume 1, Issue 3

Going More Open in Innovation: Does it Pay? (pp. 77-83)

Fatur, P., Likar, B., Ropret, M.
The research investigates into the relationship between the company’s innovation inputs and its performance. The research was carried out on the sample of 2503 Slovenian companies from manufacturing and selected service sectors. The results indicate a correlation between the revenues arising from innovations and the company's performance in terms of the financial ratios, in particularly ROE and growth of revenues from sales. Furthermore, it is shown that the distribution of innovation expenditures is related to the company’s innovation performance. The financial inputs related to external sourcing of ideas and knowledge (open innovation) have a positive correlation with the innovation performance.

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The Implementation af an Organizational Innovation: Examples of Mass Customizing Firms of the Capital Goods Industry (pp. 85-95)

Kohl, H., Depner, H.
Mass customization can be viewed as an organizational innovation, because a realization of the strategy requests a restructuring of structures and processes in a firm. The implementation of an organizational innovation is a far more complex process compared to the one of a technological innovation. Thus, it is supposed that firms implementing an organizational innovation are heavily dependent on the acquisition of external knowledge. This paper analyses – based on German case studies – how firms of the capital goods industry proceed when introducing a mass customization strategy. At the centre of consideration are answers to the questions what kind of knowledge the firms need for the implementation, how much they depend on external knowledge and whether social, organizational or spatial proximity between the actors in the innovation process is relevant for the knowledge exchange.

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Modeling Concepts for Choice Navigation of Mass Customized Solutions (pp. 97-103)

Heiskala, M., Tiihonen, J., Sievänen, M., Paloheimo, K.-S.
Customers want individualized solutions regardless of whether the solutions comprise products, services, or any combination of them. Choice navigation support is a key capability for a company offering such mass customized solutions. We seek to identify modelling concepts for supporting choice navigation. Our findings draw from our case experiences in seven companies and scientific literature. We propose concepts such as bundles, explicit customer needs and characteristics affecting determination of the optimal solution, and high-level service co-creation process. These concepts partly extend physical product configuration conceptual models, providing a good basis for improving choice navigation support for solutions.

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How to Overcome the Barriers Between Economy and Sociology With Open Innovation, Open Evaluation and Crowdfunding? (pp. 105-109)

Freund, R.
This paper is structured in the following way. The first part describes Open Innovation as a business model which uses internal and external knowledge for innovation. Part two focus on the large base of ideas which can be evaluated (intern/extern) with IT-solutions (Open Evaluation). And in part three it is argued, that crowdfunding can overcome the barriers between economy and sociology.

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Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems as an Application of Mass Customisation (pp. 111-119)

Joergensen, S. N., Nielsen, K., Joergensen, K.
Manufacturing systems are today developed as engineer to order solutions tailored to producing a specific product or a limited product mix. Such dedicated systems are not consistent with market demands for rapid product changes, product variety, and customisation, which require flexibility and responsiveness of manufacturing systems. A Reconfigurable Manufacturing System (RMS) is aimed at possess such flexibility and responsiveness and is said to be the manufacturing paradigm of tomorrow. RMS is, though, not yet fully developed. A similarity between RMS and modular product families, known from Mass Customisation (MC), is seen and based on this similarity a potential to maturing RMS further by applying MC methods and techniques is identified. Based on literature surveys this paper analyses this potential by diagnosing gabs for RMS to succeed as a MC product. For each gab MC theory holds related methods and techniques, which indicates a potential and, herby, an area of interest for further study.

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Methodology Concept of Customer Profile Definition (pp. 121-128)

Fürstner, I., Anišic, Z.
In the twenty-first century, a company has to organize around the customer in order to be a successful and viable firm. Customers expect to get what they would like, with a side order of customization. This approach raises several questions that have to be answered, one of which is that despite nowadays customers are knowledgeable in general, they are still far from being experts that can really co-create a product or a service. Therefore, the fundamental challenge is to avoid the abortion of the configuration process by the customer. Based on problem analysis regarding customers’ involvement in the configuration process, the main areas of investigation to be considered are the minimization of the complexity experienced by the customers and the reduction of the cognitive overhead, considering not only the extent of choice, but also the lack of understanding about which solution meets their needs and also the uncertainties about the behavior of the supplier and the purchasing process. The paper presents one approach towards defining the appropriate customer profile that enabes the adaptation of the process of co-creation to different customers that suits each individual customer’s needs and limitations.

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