Volume 3, Issue 2

Emotional Dynamics of Student Projects (pp. 47-51)

M. J. Platts
Every student tackling a real problem on location in a company they don’t know faces a series of crises. After the initial fact finding, a blank fog descends in which the jumbled mass of technical and human issues seems incomprehensible and the problem insoluble. In fact, the mind is sifting very sensitively but careful support is needed to help the student keep panic at bay long enough to learn by experience this is so. At a certain point, glimmers of understanding begin to take shape in the fog. Supportive dialogue helps this recognition process. The truth may be uncomfortable and support to develop the courage to say it and guidance to find the diplomacy of how to say it fruitfully for all the team in the company, are essential. The quality of human tutorial support for the student through these stages crucially affects the student’s professional competence later. The paper presents visual models of this sequence, the style of support necessary at different stages and possible patterns of emotional resistance, all of which help both students and staff recognise and gain confidence in the pattern of the process.

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A Chain is only as Strong as its Weakest Link: Managing Change in the Curriculum of Industrial Management Education (pp. 53-65)

Par Blomkvist, Lars Uppvall
In this paper we discuss the process of designing a new Industrial Management Master Program given by the department of Industrial Economics and Management at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden. The foundation of the IM-master program lies in the notions of authenticity and change. We decided early on in the design process, that our aim was to teach the skills of real world change management and to “mould” our students into industrial managers able to master complex industrial change processes. But we realized that we also had to “mould” our own pedagogical tools, examination forms, and not the least, faculty, to reach our goals. These insights lead us to emphasize a Systems perspective, both in regards to program and course design and in regards to the actual management skills we wanted to teach. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss our explicit use of a systems perspective in designing the Industrial masters program. We have identified four major parts of “our system” where changes had to be made: Premises – Learning activities – Examination – Program management. These four system parts are divided into ten subsections – “systems components”. We discuss all four system parts in relation to our goals to enhance authentic skills in change management.

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Designing an Industrial Management Curriculum, Overcoming Obstacles (pp. 67-74)

Taija Okkola, Tuomo Kassi
The degrees in Industrial Management are often so called combination degrees linking business and management to engineering. They aim to bring out the best of both worlds: to combine the logical, engineering mindset with economical and managerial awareness. Including the essentials and advanced knowledge of several fields in one degree program is a clear challenge. How to choose the essential knowledge and link it in a useful way? There is also a risk that the combination degree would produce just superficial engineers who would not be able to find their place in the world of work. This fear seems to be wrong according to a survey conducted for the graduates of 1995-2002 in Industrial Management at Lappeenranta University of Technology. One of the main reasons for the top-level employment of the graduates may be the smooth slide to the world of work through the master’s thesis. The master’s thesis reflects the whole curriculum and exposes the graduate's knowledge and skills, both in the academy and the world of work.

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An Analysis of Knowledge Areas in Industrial Engineering and Management Curriculum (pp. 75-82)

Rui M. Lima, Diana Mesquita, Marlene Amorim, Gerald Jonker, Maria Assuncao Flores
Industrial Engineering and Management (IEM) is a continuous, flexible and dynamic area of engineering. Its intervention relates not only in manufacturing industry, but also in hospitals, education systems, transport systems, financial institutions, etc. Thus, there is the need to prepare students to the extended scope of IEM and the curriculum has to provide this broad vision. This range of IEM is evident in curriculum rationale. Graduates have to be ready for a wide range of jobs in the labour market. This is a challenging demand to cope with when designing and developing the curriculum. Thus, a selection of a special focus is the basis for the curriculum design process and for that reason the curriculum programs have different emphasis. The aim of this study is to analyse four IEM curriculum programs in Europe based on a classification of courses by areas of knowledge. Furthermore, the relative weight of areas was computed based on courses’ credits. Two interrelated group of areas were used, one aggregated and another one for IEM specific areas. This framework revealed to be useful for curriculum analysis and the results show that the four program curricula have a comparable weight of specialization area of IEM and that Production Management is the specific area with the larger weight in all programs. The results show that one of the characteristics of IEM curriculum programs is diversity in the knowledge areas related to IEM specialization. This study also emphasizes the importance of a structured framework for characterization of IEM programs, enabling benchmarking exercises, and facilitating the dialogue between academia and the profession of IEM.

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IEM Graduates Transition to the Labour Market: The Importance of Internships (pp. 83-92)

Marlene Amorim, Carina Pimentel, Maria Joao Rosa
This paper addresses the role of internships for the transition of IEM graduates to the labour market. We conducted an exploratory study with former graduates from the University of Aveiro, Portugal, in order to develop our understanding about the role of internships for: i) the consolidation of knowledge acquired by students in IEM academic subjects; ii) the development of other competences which are not prevalent in IEM curriculum; iii) students’ subsequent professional integration, and their specialization in a given IEM sector or functional area. The paper provides a contribution for the development of knowledge about IEM internships, and offers insights for their improvement, notably for the articulation between the academia and the industry.

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Kaizen Workshop as an Important Element of Continuous Improvement Process (pp. 93-98)

Nedeljko Stefanic, Natasa Tosanovic, Miro Hegedic
Nowadays continuous improvement process is part of every world class manufacturing company. As such there is variety of different tools which help to manage it and lead it in the proper direction. Outcome of continuous improvement activities is flexible production with shorter lead time, and satisfied customer. To accomplish above mentioned goals, one of possible methods which can be used is kaizen. This paper presents basics of kaizen, and why it is important to conduct regular kaizen workshops as part of Continuous Improvement Process in a company. Also a Case Study about results of kaizen workshop in one Croatian Company is presented.

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Software Technologies for the Analysis of Blood Flow in the Human Body (pp. 99-104)

Aleksandar Nikolic, Milan Blagojevic, Miroslav Zivkovic, Aleksandar Aleksic, Slobodan Savic
This paper presents an overview on software technologies used in study of blood flow in the human body. Basic equations of fluid flow are presented and the basis for creating an independent software package PAK-F for the calculation of viscous fluid flow. The carotid artery bifurcation fluid flow simulations are compared by software PAK-F and COMSOL Multiphysics in the case study. Geometry of the carotid artery bifurcation is obtained through the analysis of images from CT scanner. Finite element model is created on real 3d geometry model. Presented numerical results show that developed software PAK-F corresponds well with results from COMSOL Multiphysic,

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Research in Industrial Engineering and Management: An Explorative Survey among Seven European IEM Departments (pp. 105-111)

Fiorella Brustolin, Gerald H. Jonker
The foundation of IEM departments in Europe has been accompanied by the rise of a new, complex research area, characterized by the interconnection among disciplines and the application of real life cases. This survey, based on discussions carried out at a European IEM symposium on this topic and on short interviews of the participants, illustrates the kaleidoscopic nature of IEM research and of the history of a set of seven IEM departments. IEM departments have shared research areas with closely linked academic disciplines as management, engineering and natural sciences. However, the symposium participants reported common issues and difficulties in conducting and developing IEM research, relative to the acceptation and recognition of IEM by colleagues from these traditional academic disciplines.Theanalysis of the survey data leaded to an insight in the possible causes of this phenomenon.IEM research represents a novel research approach with respect to that of classical academic disciplines, as far as its nature, methodology, and scope are concerned. This might cause a clear difficulty in aligning IEM research to the traditional academic research lines of the institutions where IEM is embedded.

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ALUMNI Indicator as a Criterion for Evaluating the Quality of Academic Institutions (pp. 113-119)

Snezana Sando, Miroslav Ferencak
This paper presents the model for ranking the quality of academic institutions, based on combination of academic and non – academic criteria. Each of the criteria consists of several indicators which are given certain relevance. The authors focused especially on the value of the ALUMNI indicator, which are given a total of 25% of the gravity factor. The use of this model will allow the forming of adequate methodology for the national ranking of the academic institutions.

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