Volume 1 - 2010

The Implementation af an Organizational Innovation: Examples of Mass Customizing Firms of the Capital Goods Industry (pp. 85-95)

Kohl, H., Depner, H.
Mass customization can be viewed as an organizational innovation, because a realization of the strategy requests a restructuring of structures and processes in a firm. The implementation of an organizational innovation is a far more complex process compared to the one of a technological innovation. Thus, it is supposed that firms implementing an organizational innovation are heavily dependent on the acquisition of external knowledge. This paper analyses – based on German case studies – how firms of the capital goods industry proceed when introducing a mass customization strategy. At the centre of consideration are answers to the questions what kind of knowledge the firms need for the implementation, how much they depend on external knowledge and whether social, organizational or spatial proximity between the actors in the innovation process is relevant for the knowledge exchange.

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Modeling Concepts for Choice Navigation of Mass Customized Solutions (pp. 97-103)

Heiskala, M., Tiihonen, J., Sievänen, M., Paloheimo, K.-S.
Customers want individualized solutions regardless of whether the solutions comprise products, services, or any combination of them. Choice navigation support is a key capability for a company offering such mass customized solutions. We seek to identify modelling concepts for supporting choice navigation. Our findings draw from our case experiences in seven companies and scientific literature. We propose concepts such as bundles, explicit customer needs and characteristics affecting determination of the optimal solution, and high-level service co-creation process. These concepts partly extend physical product configuration conceptual models, providing a good basis for improving choice navigation support for solutions.

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How to Overcome the Barriers Between Economy and Sociology With Open Innovation, Open Evaluation and Crowdfunding? (pp. 105-109)

Freund, R.
This paper is structured in the following way. The first part describes Open Innovation as a business model which uses internal and external knowledge for innovation. Part two focus on the large base of ideas which can be evaluated (intern/extern) with IT-solutions (Open Evaluation). And in part three it is argued, that crowdfunding can overcome the barriers between economy and sociology.

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Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems as an Application of Mass Customisation (pp. 111-119)

Joergensen, S. N., Nielsen, K., Joergensen, K.
Manufacturing systems are today developed as engineer to order solutions tailored to producing a specific product or a limited product mix. Such dedicated systems are not consistent with market demands for rapid product changes, product variety, and customisation, which require flexibility and responsiveness of manufacturing systems. A Reconfigurable Manufacturing System (RMS) is aimed at possess such flexibility and responsiveness and is said to be the manufacturing paradigm of tomorrow. RMS is, though, not yet fully developed. A similarity between RMS and modular product families, known from Mass Customisation (MC), is seen and based on this similarity a potential to maturing RMS further by applying MC methods and techniques is identified. Based on literature surveys this paper analyses this potential by diagnosing gabs for RMS to succeed as a MC product. For each gab MC theory holds related methods and techniques, which indicates a potential and, herby, an area of interest for further study.

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Methodology Concept of Customer Profile Definition (pp. 121-128)

Fürstner, I., Anišic, Z.
In the twenty-first century, a company has to organize around the customer in order to be a successful and viable firm. Customers expect to get what they would like, with a side order of customization. This approach raises several questions that have to be answered, one of which is that despite nowadays customers are knowledgeable in general, they are still far from being experts that can really co-create a product or a service. Therefore, the fundamental challenge is to avoid the abortion of the configuration process by the customer. Based on problem analysis regarding customers’ involvement in the configuration process, the main areas of investigation to be considered are the minimization of the complexity experienced by the customers and the reduction of the cognitive overhead, considering not only the extent of choice, but also the lack of understanding about which solution meets their needs and also the uncertainties about the behavior of the supplier and the purchasing process. The paper presents one approach towards defining the appropriate customer profile that enabes the adaptation of the process of co-creation to different customers that suits each individual customer’s needs and limitations.

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Seamless Service Delivery Solution for mHealth Application (pp. 131-143)

Boškovic, D., Kovacevic, M., Ilic,T., Arges, D.,Wisz, M.
ICT opens up many new opportunities for higher-value products and services, of which Personal Health System (PHS) is just one of the possibilities. PHS for remote management of diseases, treatment and rehabilitation, outside hospitals and care centers is based on closed-loop approaches and integrates wearable, portable or implantable devices into a subsystem coupled with appropriate platforms and services. This article discusses such subsystem that we called mHealth Console and puts an accent on gathering and analysis, interpretation and use of the multiparametric data, in conjunction with established or newly created medical knowledge, for shared patient-doctor decision support systems. After discussing business motivation for remote provisioning of healthcare services in Section1, the paper continues by describing a framework for ICT deployment on Section 2. The proposed service delivery architecture is based on Over the Top (OTT) delivery principles and enables perspective mHealth provider to reach service users (e.g. patients, health insurance, health providers, employers, pharmacies etc ) irrespective of their locations and type of physical connectivity in that location. The Section 3 continues by offering a detailed functional architecture for mHealth Console and Portal, description of signalling message flows for different SIP and DLNA based use cases. The article concludes that mHealth system is a powerful ICT based solution that process comprehensive sensor data, both environmental and behavioral, and is critical component enabling provision of monitoring and rehabilitation services to the patients. The features of the proposed solution such as independent communication session initiation, seamless and automated exchange of stored and real time information and use of devices of affordable price, makes the proposed architecture a viable solution for seamless delivery of mHealth services.

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Locawe – Developing Platform for Mobile Ubiquitous Services (pp. 145-153)

Luimula, M., Markkula, J., Kuutti, K.
Development of new advanced mobile ubiquitous multimedia services presents number of challenges which needs to be addressed in service platform design. We have been developing our Locawe platform for this goal in several research projects using systematic develop-evaluate design cycle as a research approach. During the development we have build an adaptive architecture, which we have learned to be a key requirement for a usable and sustainable service platform. The result of a number of field studies, including various field experiments and industrial pilots, have verified our solutions and proven our approach to be successful. Our Locawe platform has shown to be applicable and useful for developing different types of mobile ubiquitous services that utilise the latest technological possibilities.

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Requirements-Based Testing Process in Practice (pp. 155-161)

Skokovic, P., Rakic-Skokovic, M.
In many organizations, testing, regarded as quality verification, begins only once code has been completed. However, errors found in requirements are the leading cause of project failures, defects and rework. Even though many companies use some method of requirements management and some form of software quality testing, most of them cannot (or do not) link them together. While searching for an application lifecycle management (ALM) methodology that might give us an answer to these problems, Requirements-Based Testing (RBT) emerged as a possible solution. RBT provides a set of quality assurance activities and management tools that enable getting requirements right from the outset. This paper presents lessons learned while introducing requirements-based testing methodology, in order to put the project in control and deliver applications on time.

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A Comparative Overview of the Evolution of Software Development Models (pp. 163-172)

Matkovic, P., Tumbas, P.
Information system (IS) development began as early as 1940. Up to the 1960s, IS development was based on IT pioneers’ individual knowledge, so that this period is referred to as pioneer era, and some sources even use the term heroic age. The emergence of software crisis also saw the first forms of organised and systematised software development. Systematizing and organising the development efforts was concretised through a multitude of methodologies which appeared in the meantime, and were used for determining the structure, as well as planning and monitoring development procedures. Academic and professional literature offers a multitude of definitions of the term methodology. Most definitions explain this term as a set of clear rules and principles for the application of methods and/or procedures, with the aim of resolving various problems. More specifically, in the software development area, methodologies can be viewed as a set of rules and principles for using methods and/or procedures applied when conducting development activities by pre-defined roles in the software development process, with the use of input artifacts, aimed at obtaining output artifacts as the constituent elements of the future software. Methodologies are built on theoretical foundations, and are all based on one or more development models. In this paper, the term model refers to a systematic and logical description of a development process, without detailed elaboration of activities, performers, inputs and outputs. The paper provides an evolutional overview of development models, with their comparisons, and considers the expected avenues of future development.

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